2.4.3. Extreme Weather

Extreme Weather and Climate Change

Climate change cannot be ignored

The immediate effects of climate change pose a threat to all global industries – including football. As well as protecting players from the impact of climate change in their professional lives, football also has a social responsibility to acknowledge and reduce its carbon footprint. The football industry needs to proactively address climate risks and implement responsible and sound practices across all operations.

What you should know

Climate change can result in unsafe working conditions

The increasingly regularity of extreme weather conditions (both hot and cold) is one of the many examples of how climate change has an impact on players' working conditions. Players are also particularly at risk from air pollution while engaging in high performance exercise.

We need measures in place to protect players

This includes offering water breaks, and awareness of injuries that can be sustained as a results of extreme weather, such as hypothermia and frostbite.

Football should be a force for good

Travel demands in international football have increased and so has the need for the industry to acknowledge its carbon footprint. As well as protecting players, football has a social responsibility to protect the planet, and the environment should be considered on all levels – including transport, suppliers, and venue management.

Water Cooling Break
Extreme Weather News

Extreme Weather in Football

This is part of a series of that lays out FIFPRO’s views on some key health and wellbeing issues for professional footballers around the world.

Heat Conditions Water Break