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ACOLFUTPRO (the Colombian Association of Professional Football Players) is asking players, managers, sponsors, the media and the fans to speak up, promote discussion and call for the adoption of measures and regulations to abolish the casualness of Colombian professional football.

 

ACOLFUTPRO: ‘How long is non-compliance going to be permitted in Colombian football?’

 

'While professional football federations and Leagues in other countries are adopting measures to counter the failure of Clubs to make due payments, in order to prevent those clubs infringing their creditors’ rights and offending against fair sporting competition, quite the opposite is going on in Colombia.

 

The situation witnessed at the club Universitario de Popayán S.A. demonstrates this forcefully.
These conditions exist because the regulations of the (3) Professional Competitions allow a club to continue participating without incurring any economic or sporting sanctions, so it doesn’t pay its obligations.

 

On top of this, the participation of amateur players is permitted at any time, simply because a player is registered with the Club as an amateur on trial (Article 21 of the regulations), and there is no relegation or loss of category in the Torneo Postobon.

 

This partly explains why true professional football does not exist in Colombia.

 

Before the game against Jaguares, the Universitario players refused to compete because their wages had not been paid: the situation was remedied by bringing in amateur footballers to play that match. Five of them subsequently terminated their contracts with just cause—and the team has gone on acting with impunity.

 

These failures to pay also affect the other professional clubs in this category that comply with their obligations but have been damaged in sporting competition because they lost points to that noncompliant team which now selects amateurs.

 

So Fortaleza, América, Autónoma, Bucaramanga and Cortulua played against Universitario with its full payroll but since 7 April the other teams that played against Universitario have won their matches as a consequence of its using a team of totally amateur players.

 

Now we hear DIMAYOR (the Major Division of Colombian Professional Football) trying to justify this situation as being due to alleged non-compliance by the government authorities—as though these were responsible for controlling the propriety and management of a professional club.

 

This anarchy also affects the sponsors who have paid very important sums in order to finance Professional Competitions, not those featuring amateur players.

 

How long is DIMAYOR going to permit this happening in Colombia’s professional football, without adopting measures and mechanisms that other countries put into operation long ago in order to develop genuinely competitive football?

 

ACOLFUTPRO (the Colombian Association of Professional Football Players) is asking players, managers, sponsors, the media and the fans to speak up, promote discussion and call for the adoption of measures and regulations to abolish the casualness of our football.'