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FIFPro has held talks with a senior Council of Europe representative about football governance.

Anne Brasseur, who is preparing a Council of Europe report entitled ‘Good Football Governance’ visited FIFPro House to discuss a variety of issues in football including employment and social issues.

The Council of Europe, made up of 47 member states, is the continent's leading human rights organization. The talks addressed trafficking of minors, employment rights curtailed by the player transfer market, unpaid wages and career transition among other matters. FIFPro presented Ms. Brasseur the findings of its 2016 Global Employment Report.

The discussions also addressed discrimination and hate speech, how they are perceived by football players and what government and football authorities can do together to address these challenges.

Brasseur, a member and former President of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe introduced FIFPro to the “No Hate Speech” campaign, which FIFPro looks forward to supporting.

In light of ongoing concerns about discrimination in football, which were highlighted recently by Ghanian player Sulley Muntari’s treatment in Italy for protesting racist abuse, the participants agreed to further cooperate in this area.

The FIFPro delegation was led by FIFPro Europe President Bobby Barnes (on the left of the picture with Brasseur and FIFPro general secretary Theo van Seggelen).

Barnes said the discussions, on important issues, were fruitful.

“We had an engaged discussion with Ms. Brasseur, who showed great awareness of the problems faced by football.

“It is very encouraging that a public authority like the Council wants to collaborate with FIFPro and other football stakeholders to find solutions and share responsibility.”

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